Top 10 Best Running Backpacks Reviewed

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Searching for Running Backpacks? Take a look at the best Backpacks of 2017, Pros & Cons and what to be aware of before buying them online or in a store

One great thing about running is that it doesn’t require much gear. But being discerning about the few things you do need can go a long way toward better performance or just greater enjoyment overall. 

People often go for runs after work, during their lunch break or at random throughout the week. This can often lead to the problem of what to do with your phone, wallet, keys or any other items you might have on you at run time.

Last Updated: April 17, 2017

A ton of helpful information has been researched and added to this buying guide, just below our list of products, to assist you in your search for a pack that works best for you.

Salomon Agile
  • Salomon Agile
  • 5 out of 5
    Our rating
  • Custom System allows you to reinvent your bag for each of your different runs
  • Price: See Here
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Montane Fang
  • Montane Fang
  • 4 out of 5
    Our rating
  • Freelight Chassis constructed from lightweight contact Flyte Mesh
  • Price: See Here
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Crave Outdoors
  • Crave Outdoors
  • 4 out of 5
    Our rating
  • The water resistant diamond Rip Stop Nylon material keeps your gear safe.
  • Price: See Here
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The Top Rated Backpacks For Running

 


1. Salomon Agile

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This is one of the best middle of the road packs out there. It checks all your boxes: lightweight, mesh back and straps, spine support, body hugging fit, plentiful pockets for your phone and space for wet laundry. Won’t win any style high style awards but looks sharp. Not for an elite marathoner but also not for a slouch. Try it and see for yourself!
Pros
  • Mesh strap system for a snug fit
  • Waterproof construction to withstand the elements
  • 5L Hydration Pack with enough capacity for all your running needs
  • Comfortable adjustable Straps
  • Multi-compartments, and multiple color options
Cons
  • May not stand up to super extreme conditions


2. Montane Fang

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One of the questions you’ll want to ask yourself when considering if the Montane Fang is right for you is: how serious am I about running? If you just like to stretch your legs now and then casually this probably isn’t the pack for you. But if you live to run and prefer your gear to be state of the art then the Fang is a great option. Manufactured from Raptor zero fabric this pack is so light you will forget you’re wearing it.
Pros
  • Fancy Raptor Zero material has a hydrostatic head of 4,000mm
  • Bound seams on chassis edges make for a stronger exterior
  • Chassis constructed from ultra lightweight contact Flyte Mesh designed for comfort and breathability
  • Fully taped internal seams providing bulletproof structural integrity
Cons
  • Quite expensive


3. Crave Outdoors

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The Crave is a great lightweight pack with a strap system that contours with your back. The real reason it made our list however, is down to its hydration system. The Crave boasts a hands free detachable bladder with a hose/bite valve for convenient hydration while in action. In this price range you won’t find a better hydration system.
Pros
  • Made from RipStop nylon
  • Hands-free hydration system, with built in hygiene safety features
  • Front shoulder strap pockets for easy access to your things
  • Easy to clean and 100% water resistant
Cons
  • Straps may not fit all body types well

10. Deuter Speed Lite 10

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Small, sleek, and durable this is a great pack for running. It’s hard to go wrong with German engineering, and in the form of the Speed Lite 10 this is case in point evidence. Stuffed with useful features we feel confident with this pack as our first recommendation.
Pros
  • Wet/Dry pocket
  • Great for commuting
  • Durable – Deuter-Ripstop material
  • Lightweight 350g
  • 2.0 L Hydration system compatible
Cons
  • Not a very exciting design

9. Osprey Rev 1.5

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If you care about design aesthetics you are going to be hard pressed to find a better looking pack than this compact Osprey. Match the looks with intelligent design and seamless suspension and you’ve got yourself a winning combination. The graphics on the back are even reflective to enhance your nighttime visibility.
Pros
  • 1.5 liter hydraulics – excellent hydration system
  • Digiflip media pocket providing storage and quick access to any electronic device(s).
  • A stretch body wrap harness designed to move effortlessly with a body in motion.
  • A front panel bungee for extra storage
Cons
  • The sizing is somewhat small

8. TETON Sports Trailrunner 2.0

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Pros
  • Lightweight .9 lbs
  • FDA approved BPA free 70 ounce (2-Liter) bladder
  • Soft, breathable mesh back panel with a quick drain opening
  • Adjustment loop shoulder straps to maintain your settings throughout even the most strenuous run
  • Safety features: an orange whistle, reflective trim, and snag resistant clips
Cons
  • Not much storage space

7. Salomon S-Lab ADV Skin Hydro 12

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This as much a vest as it is a backpack. With its unique style this pack has space for your essentials and hugs your body like a second skin. As many runners can attest, chafing is an issue not to be trifled with. Although the smallest amount of friction can cause irritation — with this pack you will never run into any such problems.
Pros
  • Form-fitting
  • Composed of synthetic material
  • Twinlink chest strap system for a secure fit
  • A variety of pockets including: Two exterior side zip pockets, a chest pocket, and a back zip pocket
Cons
  • Really only designed for racing use

6. Under Armour Trance Sackpack

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A no frills option, the Trance offers many of the features of the more expensive packs at a budget price. With this model you’ll know what you’re getting: a small common sense flashpack that gets the job done.
Pros
  • 100% Polyester
  • Adjustable shoulder straps that are breathable with an integrated handle
  • Padded foam back panel for comfort & support
  • A soft lined pocket for key and/or valuables
Cons
  • May not last as long as the more expensive packs

5. Osprey Viper 5

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Cool name aside, the Viper 5 has many other things to like about it. This pack has space for a jacket, snacks, and a smaller sized bladder while maintaining a relatively miniature size. It’s durable, with a strong frame but not bulky. A great medium sized option for a run or a day hike.
Pros
  • Constructed from 100% Nylon
  • Wide panel access to the main compartment to maximize functionality of the space
  • A zip access hydration sleeve for quicker and more efficient loading/unloading of the bladder
  • Lidlock technology for easily securing a helmet to the bag
Cons
  • Limited storage space

4. Mountain Hardwear Fluid Race Vest

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Mountain Hardwear is one of those brands where you know what you’re getting upfront: well thought out, high quality goods that will stand the test of time. Another hybrid between pack and vest the Fluid is for the more serious runner who values functionality and performance highly. The coolest thing about this pack is the large chest pockets that allow you access to gels or anything you need on the fly.
Pros
  • Hydration sleeve that offers choice and flexibility of where to route your water tube
  • Security pocket on back of vest, with reinforced zipper
  • Wicking mesh in contact areas to reduce friction
  • Wide range straps for overall comfort
  • High visibility reflective strips on the back for safety
Cons
  • Limited color choices

 

Criteria used in picking out the Best  Running Backpack.

As a runner, you probably need to carry some stuff with you as you run. You may need to carry items such as your music player, water, some food, extra clothing and so forth. As such, there may be a need for you to have a running backpack. This makes a backpack a very important gear when running or when going to the gym. However, failure to make the right selection when acquiring one can lead to prove the bags useless. If the backpack you buy does not congruently fit your size and needs, it ceases to be of significance. Moreover, having the wrong backpack can lead to health conditions if it makes you uncomfortable as you run. Not only that, having the wrong back pack will make you become sick, due to the uncomfortable nature in which it will put your body under. Though a necessary sporting gear it’s very important to make sure that you pick the right running backpack. This simply means that you have to take your time in choosing the right backpack for you that will not only suit you but also be able to help you achieve your fitness goals.  The backpacks are not only limited to runners, but then nearly everyone involved in a sporting activity needs a backpack to help them move around things during or after or before their work out sessions.

The many different options out there

Before you get into a buying a sporting pack it’s crucial that you understand there are different types of sporting packs in the market. These sporting vary depending on their use, features and how they are designed. One sporting pack might be perfect for a certain type of sporting activity but be terrible for another. Before buying the sporting packs it’s important to know the type of the packs and also know the kind of sporting activity that you will be involved in. Different runners prefer different types of sporting backpacks. There are 5 main styles that we commonly refer to:

  1. Running backpacks

These are your more traditional “outdoor” backpacks. These type of backpacks have been specifically designed for use by runners, though other people can also use it. They can usually be used interchangeable for day hikes or running, but lately there have been some packs designed specifically for running. They tend to have the most storage of all the packs and can be used for lots of other activities like vacation trips, school, etc. regardless of the option of many storage the backpacks are still light so that they don’t prove to be too heavy during the running experience or hiking.

  1. Hydration backpacks

The quintessential hydration pack is pretty much anything by Camelbak. A hydration pack is specially designed backpack or waist bag that carries a bladder full of fluid. This bladder feeds a hose, which is then led over your shoulder and clipped in place on the chest strap of the bag. The result is an easy to grab means to drinking; just by sucking the valve on the hose you can easily quench your thirst, but still keep your hands safely on the handlebars or helping you run. It’s usually a lot slimmer than a traditional backpack, with a slot for your bladder, and a few small storage pockets. The primary purpose is, you guessed it, hydration. Just like its name this backpack serves the purpose of carrying liquids that keep you hydrates during any work out session. They can be deemed as the lightest backpacks, though not really, they can only be used for that purpose of carrying dehydration fluids.

  1. Waist packs

Unique and very stylish. Can easily be accessed without fear of interrupting your work out session. They can’t be really being considered a backpack because they are tied to the waist but then they are wonderful packs that are tied around the waste as you work out or just go to the gym. These waist packs are praised for one major aspect, accessibility. The accessibility of your backpack is very important especially when you are enjoying that run and want to grab a bottle of water or that energy chew. Each runner would want a backpack that is accessed easily and doesn’t involve stopping the workout session in order to get something from the backpack. There are really two types of waist packs:

1) hydration belts

2) running belts.

The two are pretty similar it’s just that the hydration waist pack must serve the hydration purpose just like the hydration backpack and therefore the only difference is the latter doesn’t have any holsters for water bottles.

  1. Race vests

These are a very unique kind of sporting backs. The design is very unique and incorporates the features of both running backpacks and hydration backpacks. These are kind of a mix between running backpacks and hydration backpacks. They’re extremely lightweight, but usually have more storage on the front straps and actually look more like vests.

  1. Handheld hydration packs

These type of packs are what many simply call the bottle carrier. They are handheld so no need to be referred to as backpacks.

 

Now that you know the importance of having a backpack it’s good to know the criteria that was used in picking the Best 10 running backpacks. Several factors were considered when picking out the backpacks and these factors were:

Overall Design

This is a very important feature when looking for any type of backpack and not just a running backpack. The frame type will determine many things that surround the backpack like fit, comfortability, accessibility and definitely the functionality of the backpack. Different backpacks have different types of frame types. These designs vary and suit the different runners, so what are the different frame types of running backpacks?

Framed Backpacks: The majority of packs sold at REI today are body-hugging internal frame packs that are designed to keep a hiker stable on uneven, off-trail terrain. They may incorporate a variety of load-support technologies that all function to transfer the load to the hips.

Organization and Capacity: A pack with a higher capacity may be an appropriate choice if you’re carrying a heavy, irregular load, like toting gear on those long trail runs. You might even look for something with external pockets for more gear organization options.

Weight: Ultralight devotees who like to hike fast and light might choose a frameless pack or a climbing pack where the frame is removable for weight savings.

Make sure while you are buying your running backpack you try it out and check which frame suits you best, if you are doing an online purchase then it’s good to check if the website has a guide on the different frame types available for running backpacks. Make sure you settle for the most comfortable frame that gives a good fit. As this will guarantee you a good running experience.

Ventilation

For those who sweat a lot then they should make sure that their running backpacks have this very important feature. A running backpack is made sure to have a ventilation effect if it has s suspended mesh on the backside of the backpack. Some packs feature a suspended mesh back panel to combat the sweaty-back syndrome you tend to get with internal frame packs that ride against your back. Also called a “tension-mesh suspension,” this is a trampoline-like design where the frame-supported pack bag rides along a few inches away from your back, which instead rests against the highly breathable mesh. Ventilation “chimneys” that are built into back panels and promote airflow are another option meant to solve the same issue.

Pack Access

The accessibility of your backpack is very important especially when you are enjoying that run and want to grab a bottle of water or that energy chew. Each runner would want a backpack that is accessed easily and doesn’t involve stopping the workout session in order to get something from the backpack. So how does a back pack achieve the accessibility feature:

Top-loading openings are pretty standard. Items not needed until the end of the day go deep inside.

Panel access: Some packs also offer a zippered front panel which folds open exposing the full interior of the pack, or a side zipper, which also makes it easier to reach items deeper in your pack.

 

Pockets

Pockets are a very important aspect of any given backpack, they literally are like the heart of the backpack. They determine the storage of the backpack and the accessibility of the backpack. Here are the types of pockets found on the different types of running backpacks.

Elasticized side pockets: They lie flat when empty, but stretch out to hold a water bottle, tent poles or other loose objects

Hip belt pockets: These accommodate small items you want to reach quickly — a smartphone, snacks, packets of energy gel, etc.

Shovel pockets: These are basically flaps stitched onto the front of a pack bag with a buckle closure at the top. Originally intended to hold a snow shovel, they now pop up on many 3-season packs, serving as stash spots for a map, jacket or other loose, lightweight items.

Front pocket(s): Sometimes added to the exterior of a shovel pocket, these can hold smaller, less-bulky items.

Though pockets vary depending on size and the type of the running backpacks it’s important to first know the sporting activity you will be involved in before picking out a running backpack with a certain number of pockets. If you are going for a short run, then you will probably need just a bottle of water and an energy bar that means less pockets, longer runs might require more pockets for more storage and also always remember that you don’t need to much weight on you as you run. Weight is a very important determining factor.  If you’re going to doing different activities, for example, street races and trail running, then you’ll want two different packs.  Don’t try to save money at the expense of everything else.  Just get the two packs and be done with it. Also know the size of your pocket, don’t put things that exceed the size of the pockets of running backpacks as this will cause tear and fast wear on the pockets.  Just carry what you really need for your running experience.If you want to rock a pack with pockets and pouches, make sure they are located in a place that will be comfortable for you. All the packs we carry are designed for running, so it really comes down to what you think will be most convenient. Think about your range of motion when running, and choose a pack with pockets that will be easily accessible, but won’t get in the way.

 

 Other Important Factors To Consider

Removable Day-pack / Top Lid

Some packs are designed with a removal day pack that is perfect for day trips, summit hikes or supply runs during a thru-hike. Some packs have top lids that detach from the main pack and convert into a hip belt pack for day trips. This is a new feature that is being implemented by manufacturers to make backpacks more comfortable and accessible during running, also the top lid increases the storage feature of the running backpack. Stylish and still functions well.

Added Compartment Options

The option for additional compartments is also another useful feature for a running backpack especially if you plan on having an outdoor experience during your running session. Its makes running sessions possible even when enjoying outdoor activities like hiking. This is a zippered stash spot near the bottom of a pack bag. It’s a useful feature if you don’t want to use a stuff sack for your sleeping bag. Alternately, this space can hold other gear that you’d like to reach easily. More storage for you when it comes to the sleeping bag compartment.

Storage

This is typically the other primary reason for purchasing a running backpack.  You already determined what you’ll be using your pack for above, so that should dictate how much storage you need. Storage is mostly determined by the pockets of the backpack and other compartments available on the backpack. Pockets are a very important aspect of any given backpack, they literally are like the heart of the backpack. They determine the storage of the backpack and the accessibility of the backpack. Here are the types of pockets found on the different types of running backpacks.

Elasticized side pockets: They lie flat when empty, but stretch out to hold a water bottle, tent poles or other loose objects

Hip belt pockets: These accommodate small items you want to reach quickly — a smartphone, snacks, packets of energy gel, etc.

Shovel pockets: These are basically flaps stitched onto the front of a pack bag with a buckle closure at the top. Originally intended to hold a snow shovel, they now pop up on many 3-season packs, serving as stash spots for a map, jacket or other loose, lightweight items.

Front pocket(s): Sometimes added to the exterior of a shovel pocket, these can hold smaller, less-bulky items.

Though pockets vary depending on size and the type of the running backpacks it’s important to first know the sporting activity you will be involved in before picking out a running backpack with a certain number of pockets. Also keep in mind that you may want some storage to be accessible during the run, so having all pockets on the back of the pack or in an unreachable area may not be ideal.

Padding

If you’re using a lightweight pack with a fairly minimalistic hip belt and lumbar pad, you can encounter sore spots on your hips and lower back. If this is the case for you, consider using a cushier hip belt. This additional feature helps in reducing stress on your lower back section hence reduce back pains that may be caused by carrying the backpack.

Attachment Points

If you frequently travel with an ice axe or trekking poles, look for tool loops that allow you to attach them to the exterior of the pack. Rare is the pack that does not offer at least a pair of tool loops. You might also look for the following:

A daisy chain — a length of webbing stitched to the outside of a pack — to provide multiple gear loops for attaching a helmet or tools.

A reinforced crampon patch (to prevent crampon points from gouging holes in the pack bag).

Gear loops on the hip belt or low on the pack body, useful as clip-on points for gear or possibly as attachment points for skis.

 

Rain cover

Though a very minor factor still very important to consider if your running backpack is weather resistant specially to rain. This will not only keep your stuff dry but also make the backpack light weight regardless of the pouring rain. If you expect rain on your trip, this is a good item to carry. Pack fabric interiors are usually treated with a waterproof coating. Yet packs have seams and zippers where water can seep through, and the fabric’s exterior absorbs some water weight during a downpour. An alternative: bundling gear internally in waterproof “dry” stuff sacks. Lightweight dry sacks can be a better option in windy conditions; strong gusts have the potential to abruptly peel a cover right off a pack

The Fit

Fitting is very crucial for any sporting gear but a little challenging. Fit is the most important thing to think about when choosing a running pack. No matter how awesome a pack is, you’ll never wear it if it doesn’t fit properly.But with a little help here and there then you can easily come out of a store with a running backpack that fits you perfectly. It’s important to consider your body size and also the frame type of the backpack when looking for a good fit. Women’s packs are different to Men’s! We have boobs and the men’s packs sometimes sit in a really awkward position on the front. However, everyone is different so try on as many as you can. Some packs are available in multiple sizes, from extra small to large, which fit a range of torso lengths. These ranges vary by manufacturer and by gender. Check the product specs tab for size details of a specific pack. Other packs may feature an adjustable suspension, which can be modified to fit your torso, especially if you’re in-between sizes. The drawback: An adjustable harness adds a little weight to a pack. Also the fit can be altered by weight. In the shop you try on a variety of styles but until you get your kit in there you won’t know the true fit. So think about taking your kit along with you to try out the rucksack fully weighted. Even if the pack you like best is not available in sizes, many offer adjustable shoulder and sternum straps with side compression cinch straps so you can create a nearly custom fit. Women might find an even better fit in a women’s specific pack.

Torso Length

Some packs are available in multiple sizes, from extra small to large, which fit a range of torso lengths. These ranges vary by manufacturer and by gender. Check the product specs tab for size details of a specific pack. Other packs may feature an adjustable suspension, which can be modified to fit your torso, especially if you’re in-between sizes. The drawback: An adjustable harness adds a little weight to a pack.

 

Waist Size

The majority of a backpack’s weight, 80 percent or more, should be supported by your hips. Backpack hip belts usually accommodate a wide range of hip sizes, from the mid-20 inches to the mid-40 inches. People with narrow waists sometimes find they cannot make a standard hip belt tight enough and need a smaller size. Some packs offer interchangeable hip belts, making it possible to swap out one size for another.

 

Packs for Guys, Packs for Girls

We’d like to assume this step is pretty obvious, but when we see guys running around town with a Pink CamelBak Annadel strapped to him we started to wonder…. The backpacks for women and men vary not only from color but also from the design that’s why its important to consult and know if there are running backpacks for women and for men so that you make the right choice of purchasing the right running backpack for you. So, step one, decide if you need a pack for a man or a woman.

Determine Pack Use

What purpose will your backpack serving, determines the type of pack you will be having on your shoulder as you enjoy that run in the morning. All packs are not created equal.  Whether you run a few miles each day, enjoy half-marathons, triathlons, or trail running, it all matters.

The main thing you want to determine here is size and style.  If you’re going to be gone on a trail run for the entire day you’ll likely need a larger bag for hydration and snacks, whereas a half-marathon runner may be able to get away with a minimalist pack.

Weight, weight, weight.  Weight is a very important determining factor.  If you’re going to doing different activities, for example, street races and trail running, then you’ll want two different packs.  Don’t try to save money at the expense of everything else.  Just get the two packs and be done with it.

Carrying Capacity

Think about what essentials you want to take with you on your run. Will you need pockets or pouches that can accommodate extra layers (like a lightweight jacket or a pair of gloves)? Do you need to carry gel or chew packets, or a bottle of electrolyte tabs? Do you want a space for your smart phone or MP3 player? Instead of looking for a pack that can carry everything including the kitchen sink, focus on finding a model that’s just big enough for your needs. Too much extra space will add unnecessary weight.

Straps

Now that you’ve determined what you’ll be using the pack for you can make a good decision on what kind of straps you’ll need. Are you trying to reduce bounce and movement?  You may want to look into Nathan’s propulsion harness which allows the pack to move, but naturally with your stride. Are you going to be carrying a lot of weight?  You’ll want to go with waist straps if your pack is going to weight over 6 pounds; these will help with stability as well as weight. Make sure all straps are adjustable.  All packs have a little bit of break in period where you’ll need to adjust the straps for the best fit.

Size matters

You don’t want excess space and neither do you want it too tight inside. Find out what obligatory kit you need and decide on the size of the pack by liters. I bought a 5-liter pack as my race will last a day. Neil on the other hand has opted for a 10-liter pack as he is running a longer race, will be spending a night out in the mountains so has to carry with him more obligatory kit.

 

Hydration

For many people this is one of the primary reasons for grabbing a running backpack Hot climate?  Make sure you get an insulated bladder or you’ll be drinking warm water. Your hydration needs will vary depending on the intensity and duration of your workout, how much you sweat, and your personal preference. Think about how much fluid you’ll want to carry with you, and select a pack that can accommodate your needs. If you want to keep the weight down and just carry less hydration, try a more streamlined 2-liter vest.  If your hydration needs vary from one run to the next, try a pack with a bladder and additional pockets for bottles or flasks.

Water – You need to first decide where you’re going to carry your water – in a bladder within the rucksack or in water bottles on the front? For my race I will be refilling my water supply regularly and I don’t want the hassle of having to remove the sack at every refreshment point so I have opted to wear the water bottles on the front. Another advantage of this is that you can see how much water you’ve drunk, and how much you have left to get you to the next refueling point which is definitely more difficult with a bladder system.

Don’t drink a lot of water or need much?  Maybe you’re just jogging to work.  If that’s the case, you can probably save a little money by just getting a pack with a water bottle instead of a hydration bladder.

What size reservoir do you need?  Here’s a quick guide:

  • 34-50 ounces (1L or 1.5L) = minimalists, kids, short distance, commuters
  • 68 ounces (2L) = most popular, balance between reasonable weight and bulk, half-marathon
  • 102 ounces (3L) =full marathon or trail runners

Note: 1L water = 2 pounds of weight

Material

The material plays an important role in determining the durability of any given type of running backpack. The materials are also made to suit different weather conditions and offer different weather resistant features. For some people the material will make or break it for them.

Hot climate?  Make sure you get a breathable pack, which usually means a pack made with a lot of strong mesh material.

Cold climate?  You may want to stay away from the mesh and towards a solid material for a little bit of insulation.

Women’s specific hydration packs

Female athletes may find that female-specific hydration packs fit them better than unisex packs, making them more comfortable and easy to wear. Obviously the right pack is the one that fits you best – irrespective of gender – but generally speaking they differ from unisex packs in a couple of ways.The padded shoulder straps are usually narrower both in actual size and the angle at which they come off the pack. This helps avoid any potential hot spots and rubbing from straps that are too wide. The chest strap is also usually higher to ensure that it fastens correctly above your chest and not across it, so that it is not restrictive for women. The waist strap is smaller to account for slimmer waists, and the packs are proportionally smaller and more compact so that it fits on your back correctly. This means that the weight of the pack is evenly spread-out in the correct place, so women should find the packs comfier for longer rides and runs.

Female-specific hydration packs have been cleverly designed and have the same features and water capacity as their unisex counter-parts, however some have slightly less storage capacity due to their more compact size so this is worth checking if this is a critical factor for you.

Safety

Last, but not least, is safety.  We save safety for last because most packs have reflective strips or material built into the pack.  The only situation that may require a little extra consideration is running at night.  If you happen to run when it’s dark out, then you’ll definitely want to ensure your pack has a good portion of reflective material on it.

Safety whistle anyone?  Many packs will come with an emergency whistle, or you can just buy one and tie it to your straps.

 

FAQ

Q. What will you be using it for?

A. It’s important to know the use of the backpack before making any purchase. Most of us might want to buy a back pack because its trendy or fashionable. But then the back pack might fail to meet our needs. If you are a runner who travels lightly or a runner who has a lot of stuff that they use during their running sessions. Whichever the case, make sure you do enough research so that you get the bag that will not only be stylish but will also serve the purpose.

Q. How much can it hold, and how much do you need it to hold?

A. The capacity of the back pack you will buy is totally determined by its use. It’s important to be cautious of the space capacity of the backpack so that you don’t put too much that will end up straining the bag and you also. Also too much empty space is not something you want to have when running. When checking the capacity make sure you look at all the pockets and the compartments of the backpack. Make sure the compartments suite your need. Of late there have been backpacks that the space capacity can be enlarged by extra zippers. You can consider these options also.

 

Q. What is the material?

A. The material should be able to withstand the test of time and any rough conditions. You can consult with the sales person on the different materials used by the different brands so that to determine the best. Some material are waterproof and others can withstand damage from sun light. You will have plenty of options that will be able to suite your needs. All in all, when it comes to material focus more on durability than style.

Q. What functions does it come with?

A. Many backpacks for running that come with waist and chest straps are not just there for the looks. They actually serve a purpose! Many hikers use them, and for the same reason, everyday runners and joggers should also put them to good use. Being aware of ‘the little extras’ your bag offers is a great way to put it to greater use. They not only give you more support and stability from the weight of the bag, but they also reduce the stress running bags sometimes put on your shoulders, neck and back.

Q. How much are you willing to spend?

A. Your budget is very important when it comes to making this long term sport investment. Durability should be given very high importance and also make sure you stick to your budget. Another thing is to make sure you are buying the backpack that will be able to serve you well.

The next time you want to buy a running backpack it’s important to consider the following tips while shopping for that favorite backpack.

  1. Get a backpack with waist and chest straps

This is the single most important factor in buying a backpack for run commuting. With just the usual pair of arm straps, the bag will jiggle up, down, left, right, back, forth – all over the place. It’s not nice. But if you buy a back with waist straps and chest straps, and all of a sudden the bag begins to hold steady! A set of adjustable straps to keep the bag firm will give you a chance to focus on your run (not just your balance!).

  1. Get a light pack

Any bag is going to add weight – and therefore difficulty – to your run. When run commuting it’s almost inevitable that you’ll need to take something with you, even if just a spare pair of underwear and your lunch, but that shouldn’t stop you from trying to minimize the weight you carry. If you can cut down your load, you can buy a smaller backpack – one which is in itself lighter, easier to secure, and better for your back!

  1. Get a breathable bag

If you’re anything like me, you’re going to sweat while you run to work – even if only in the summer. But the build-up of sweat, and the horrible feeling of being sweaty, can be reduced by picking a bag with breathable back and breathable fabric. That can keep the backpack drier, keep your skin and clothes drier, and lead to a far more pleasant (and less chafing) experience.

 

The solution is getting the best running backpack for your needs. No longer will you need to hide things under rocks or try to get your keys to stay put in the edge of your compression shorts. Given their size, running packs are often cheaper than their larger counterparts. These packs are versatile as well, with plenty of utility beyond running.


Here are some sources we used while conducting our research:

Sources

  1. Ben Hobson, How to pick the best running backpack, Health Website,
  2. James Billington, 10 best running backpacks, Consumer Website,
  3. Editor, Montane VIA Trail Series Fang 5 Backpack Review, Running Website,
  4. Editor, Crave Outdoors Hydration Pack [Review], Consumer Website,
  5. Tom Caughlan, Mountain Hardwear Fluid Race Vest, Sporting Website,
  6. Kevin Glover, Osprey Viper 5 Hydration Pack Review, Sporting Website,
  7. Andy Wellman, Salomon S-LAB ADV SKIN3 12SET Review, Sporting Website,
  8. Editor, Teton Sports TrailRunner 2.0 Hydration Backpack w/ Bladder Review | Rating 4.1 out of 5, Sporting Website,
  9. Corey, Rev 1.5 Osprey Pack – Review, Sporting Website,
  10. Dave Roberts, Osprey Rev 1.5 Running Pack Review, Running Website,
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