Top Things All New Runners Should Know

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Some of the top things all new runners should know is that running is hard, but so rewarding. Top Things All New Runners Should Know www.runnerclick.com

Welcome to the wonderful world of running, new runner.

It is filled with blisters and shin splits at first. But also with lower stress levels, looser pants and so much more to gain.

This includes increased self-esteem, a healthier and fit body, and newfound inner strength.

From one experienced runner to another, there are lots of things all new runners should know.

For starters, the deeper a new runner gets into their running journey the more they will fall in love with it. But there are often long periods of time where we are trying to hate to run just a little bit less.

Let me tell you that it is worth every bead of sweat, every ounce of effort and every sacrifice we make as new runners to finally feel a sense of belonging in the sport.

But while we are still traveling down our path early, here are the top things all new runners should—and need to—know.

Photo by Sharon McCutcheon on Unsplash

If You Run, You’re A Runner

The biggest thing runners should know is that the act of running makes them a runner.

This might seem obvious, but pick up the activity and chances are you won’t really feel like a runner.

Runners are guilty of comparing themselves to others. That means if the runner needs to take walk breaks, the runner feels less than. If a person can’t run a 10, or 9, or 8 or 7-minute mile, the runner feels less than.

The most important thing to know about running is a mile is a mile. So who cares how long or short it takes to get there?

Just stick with it. Speed comes with time, training and endurance. Don’t let a slow start in your journey when it comes to progression take you off course.

It’s A Free Activity That Costs Lots Of Money

Running is the best fitness activity because it is absolutely free. It doesn’t require any fancy or expensive gym equipment or membership.

Running costs lots of money.

Or at least it can.

New runners need new running sneakers. And to get properly fitted for a pair at that.

Then there is new workout clothes, sports nutrition for long runs, and other gear depending on the distance and time of day. From headlamps to hydration vests the list—and the price goes on and on.

Let me add that it is worth every cent for the essentials. Running doesn’t have to cost a lot. Know when to buy sneakers on sale and invest in a few quality items. After all, it’s investing in your health.

Races Are Addicting

Speaking of shelling out the cash for our “inexpensive hobby,” just wait to you do your first race.

Races are so addicting in the best way possible. It is the best way for new runners to stay motivated and continue running for more than a week. It requires training and putting in the work.

But it feels so good to cross that finish line and embrace that accomplishment. So much so that most runners go home and sign up for another one.

Once a new runner is then a not so new runner, you can expect your calendar to be filled with races throughout the month.

Photo by Alexandre Pimentel on Unsplash

Running Is So Hard

All new runners need to know that running is hard. It takes lots of mental grit and determination to even get out on the path or trail let alone power through more than one mile.

It can be hard on the body in the beginning. Running too much too soon causes shin splints and many runners suffer from plantar fasciitis, a common running injury that is inflammation at the bottom of the foot.

Those who weren’t working out prior to running find they are sore when they start consistently running when using muscles.

It takes a lot of energy to keep on moving, so how a runner fuels before their runs is so important. A poor diet means feeling sluggish during that run.

Improper form can make running feel even harder. That’s because bad posture, over-striding and improper breathing all effects running economy and efficiency.

Running Is So Rewarding

No one said running is easy. But all new runners should also know that running is so rewarding.

There are so many health benefits, mind, body, and soul. Running is more than a way to workout. It becomes a way of life. It is transformative.

The many rewards new runners can look forward to including weight loss, increased fitness, less stress, and a boost in mood.

Runners learn that you can do anything you put your mind to. That no goal is too small or out of reach.

There Are Different Genres Of Running—Find Yours

Another thing new runners should know is that there are different genres of running. There are trail running and road runner. There is sprinting short distance and ultra running. There is cross-country and there is track.

Runners don’t need to run all these kinds or be “good” at all. Some prefer trails over roads. Some prefer track running for sprinting. Some like a combo like ultra trail running.

Try all different types and find one that speaks the most for you.

Photo by Adi Goldstein on Unsplash

All Runners Quit At One Point

New runners should know that all runners “quit” at some point in their running careers. It’s okay to take time off along the road. 

While this might be the last thing new runners are thinking about, there will come a day when you just don’t want to run anymore. 

This doesn’t mean the runner is giving up. This might be there is an injury, or the running is preventing an injury. It could mean taking a week or two off after intense training.

It might mean enjoying a vacation for a few days and skipping runs. 

Life is all about balance. Take the time off to recover. 

Anyone Can Make A Comeback

The good news that all new runners should know is that anyone can make a comeback. Whether it’s a few days off because of an illness or a months break because life got in the way, running will always be there. 

No matter how many times a runner hangs up their shoes, it will always allow for you to put them back on. It might mean starting back slow again, but It never too late to return to running.

 

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