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10 Best Fiber Cereals Compared & Rated

last updated Nov 18, 2018
Fiber is an extremely important part of a healthy diet, contributing to the health of your digestive tract, your heart, your joints, your colon–well, you get the idea. Fiber helps every part of our bodies! And with plenty of Americans not getting their recommended daily dose of fiber, we should learn from others’ mistakes and find more ways to fit fiber into our diets. One of the ways we can do this is by choosing breakfast cereals that are rich in fiber.

As runners, we understand the true meaning of the word busy. Many of us strive to keep the balance of our work schedules, trying to maintain a social life, getting time in for quality personal time, and still committing to an active athletic lifestyle. But being busy is no excuse to skip breakfast and to miss one of our best opportunities to sneak in that extra fiber.

We’ve put together a list of the best fiber cereals to start your day off right, and plenty of the cereals on our list are packed with other nutrients and vitamins that will benefit your body and give you plenty of natural energy to keep you going. Take a look at our custom criteria we used to narrow down our selection and check out our FAQ for more info on fiber!
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By Max Knapp:

Our list of best fiber cereals provides you with a tasty and nutritious breakfast option. Fiber is an essential part of our diet and it is important that we all incorporate it into our daily diets. Take a look at our FAQ section and learn about how we came up with our most current list of options. 08/11/18 We've left the options on our list largely the same because of their great fiber content and convenience. We have, however, edited our criteria for the best fiber cereals for accuracy and readability to keep you informed and to help you make the best choices for your health when it comes to the best fiber cereals.

Sorting Options
Features Advanced Features Value Use By Default
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Name
Rating
Shops
1
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
96.5
Features
98%
Advanced Features
97%
Value
95%
Use
96%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$22.44
2
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
95.3
Features
97%
Advanced Features
98%
Value
92%
Use
94%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$72.82
3
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
95.5
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95%
Advanced Features
96%
Value
94%
Use
97%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$26.88
4
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
94.8
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96%
Advanced Features
94%
Value
96%
Use
93%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$43.48
5
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
93
Features
95%
Advanced Features
93%
Value
93%
Use
91%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$24.99
6
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
92.8
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95%
Advanced Features
93%
Value
91%
Use
92%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
7
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
90.5
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91%
Advanced Features
90%
Value
92%
Use
89%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$29.25
8
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
90
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91%
Advanced Features
89%
Value
92%
Use
88%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$18.95
9
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
89
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90%
Advanced Features
87%
Value
91%
Use
88%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
$33.58
10
The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
88.5
Features
90%
Advanced Features
88%
Value
87%
Use
89%
Price Comparison Last Updated (11.12.18)
In Depth Review Top 10
  • Fiber One (General Mills)
  • All Bran Buds (Kellog’s)
  • Grape Nuts (Post)
  • Familia Muesli
  • Barbara’s High Fiber Medley
  • Kirkland Cinnamon Pecan Cereal
  • Heartland Granola
  • Kashi GoLean Honey Almond Flax Crunch
  • Mini Wheats (Kellog’s)
  • Organic Blue Corn Flakes (Health Valley)
Table of contents
  • Criteria Used for Evaluation
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Sources

10 Best Fiber Cereals

1. Fiber One (General Mills)

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
96.5
Fiber One (General Mills)
Features
98
Advanced Features
97
Value
95
Use
96
best offer for today
$22.44
Pros:

More than half of your RDT of fiber

Stays crunchy in milk

Whole grain taste

Average price

Cons:

Start eating slowly or you may experience stomach discomfort

Fiber One cereal by General Mills packs a whopping 14 grams of fiber into each half-cup serving. This mega amount of fiber is 55% of the daily recommended intake of fiber.

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Nutritional Content

In addition to all of that fiber, a serving of Fiber One has 60 calories, one gram of fat, and two grams of protein. Better yet, there is no added sugar, so this fiber cereal is great for people who are keeping a close eye on their sugar intake.

Taste

Reviewers enjoy the taste of Fiber one and love the fact that this fiber cereal holds its crunch in milk.

Cost and Value

This fiber cereal is about the average price of other cereals., which makes it good value for money considering how high it ranks on the list.

2. All Bran Buds (Kellog’s)

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
95.3
All Bran Buds (Kellog’s)
Features
97
Advanced Features
98
Value
92
Use
94
best offer for today
$72.82
Pros:

Extra high fiber content

Gives 46% of the daily recommended fiber

Crunchy taste

Contains psyllium which is good for the heart

Cons:

High in sugar

Questionable taste

This fiber cereal packs a whopping 39 grams of fiber per cup! However, sugar watchers beware: All-Bran Buds also has 24 grams of sugar per cup.

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Nutritional Value

With 36 grams of fiber in each cup of this cereal, you are definitely getting a good daily dose from All-Bran Buds. However, 24 grams of sugar is a little concerning for those with diabetes or that are simply trying to decrease their sugar intake. All Bran Buds also has (per cup) 210 calories, 3 grams of fat, and 11 vitamins and minerals.

Taste

Users enjoy the extra crunch this fiber cereal offers. Most users say this cereal tastes as you would expect a fiber cereal to taste. One user described it as tasting like “crunchy dirt.”

Cost and Value

This fiber cereal is averagely pricier than other products.

3. Grape Nuts (Post)

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
95.5
Grape Nuts (Post)
Features
95
Advanced Features
96
Value
94
Use
97
best offer for today
$26.88
Pros:

High in protein for a fiber cereal

Very crunchy

Users report that this fiber cereal never gets soggy

No added sugar

Cons:

Expensive

High in calories

This fiber cereal is an old favorite. Its crunchy goodness packs in 6 grams of fiber in each half-cup serving.

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Nutrition Content

Along with its 6 grams of fiber, each half cup of Grape Nuts has 210 calories, 1 gram of fat, 5 grams of sugar, and 6 grams of protein.

Taste

Users report loving the classic, nutty/toasty taste of grape nuts. They also really enjoy using it as a topping for yogurt or salads or mixing it into a smoothie to make it more filling.

Cost and Value

Grape Nuts has risen in price recently, so it is more expensive than other fiber cereals.

4. Familia Muesli

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
94.8
Familia Muesli
Features
96
Advanced Features
94
Value
96
Use
93
best offer for today
$43.48
Pros:

Good amount of protein

Multiple textures and flavors in cereal

No added sugar

4 grams of fiber per half cup serving

Cons:

More expensive than other cereals

High calorie

This fiber-rich granola-like cereal has 4 grams of fiber per half-cup serving and no added sugar.

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Nutritional Content

Four grams of fiber isn’t all Familia Muesli has to offer as a fiber cereal. It also has 210 calories to keep you energized, 3 grams of fat, and 6 grams of protein. Even though it has no added sugar, this fiber cereal does contain 7 grams of naturally occurring sugars.

Taste

Users report this fiber cereal as being very delicious as long as it is prepared properly. To prepare Familia Muesli for eating, it has to soak in milk or yogurt for a few minutes. Users that forgot this step say that it tastes like cardboard if it isn’t soaked long enough.

Cost and Value

Considered a specialty product, Familia Muesli is a little more expensive than other fiber cereals.

5. Barbara’s High Fiber Medley

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
93
Barbara’s High Fiber Medley
Features
95
Advanced Features
93
Value
93
Use
91
best offer for today
$24.99
Pros:

Inexpensive

High in fiber and protein

Contains 15% of the RDV of iron

Non-GMO, vegan, and contains whole grains

Cons:

Not as commonly found as other fiber cereals

With 14 grams of fiber per serving, Barbara’s Bakery High Fiber Medley is also cholesterol free, kosher, low fat, low sodium, low-sugar, non-GMO, vegan, and contains whole grains. That’s a lot to put in a little box!

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Nutritional Content

In addition to the 14 grams of fiber, one serving of this fiber cereal will give you 180 calories, 8 grams of sugar, and 5 grams of protein. It also contains 15% of the RDV of iron.

Taste

Users report that this fiber cereal has just the right amount of sweetness and is enjoyed as breakfast or for a snack.

Cost and Value

Barbara’s Bakery High Fiber Medley is slightly less expensive than other fiber cereals.

6. Kirkland Cinnamon Pecan Cereal

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
92.8
Kirkland Cinnamon Pecan Cereal
Features
95
Advanced Features
93
Value
91
Use
92
best offer for today
Pros:

Very tasty

Filling

High in fiber and protein

Less expensive

Cons:

Only available at one retailer

This fiber cereal is a combination of granola, oat clusters, wheat flakes, pecans, and cinnamon, and packs in 7 grams of fiber per serving.

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Nutritional Content

This high fiber cereal also gives you 9 grams of protein per serving, giving your muscles the fuel they need to repair and grow. And with only 190 calories and a half gram of saturated fat per ¾ cup serving, this fiber cereal won’t hurt your waistline.

Taste

Users report this as one of the best tasting high fiber cereals they have had, with some even describing it as dessert-like. It is also reported to be very filling and good as a snack.

Cost and Value

This is sold as a bulk product, so it is a little less expensive than other high fiber cereals.

7. Heartland Granola

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
90.5
Heartland Granola
Features
91
Advanced Features
90
Value
92
Use
89
best offer for today
$29.25
Pros:

Flavorful

Also has protein

Made with whole grain

Comes in a case of 6 - 14 oz box

Cons:

Some grocery stores do not carry this brand

A half-cup serving of this fiber cereal provides 4 grams of fiber. Heartland Granola is one of the original natural brands of granola.

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Nutritional Content

In addition to 4 grams of fiber, a serving of Heartland Granola has 240 calories, 6 grams of fat, zero cholesterol, 13 grams of sugar, and 5 grams of protein. It contains a variety of ingredients that are potential allergens, such as soy, wheat, tree nuts, and milk.

Taste

Users rate this fiber cereal as highly flavorful and filling.

Cost and Value

This fiber cereal is just a little more expensive than the average fiber cereal.

8. Kashi GoLean Honey Almond Flax Crunch

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
90
Kashi GoLean Honey Almond Flax Crunch
Features
91
Advanced Features
89
Value
92
Use
88
best offer for today
$18.95
Pros:

Good taste

Lots of fiber and protein

Average price

100% whole grain

Cons:

Chicory root can irritate the stomach

This crunchy Kashi fiber cereal provides you with 8 grams of fiber and a bit of sweetness to start off your day.

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Nutritional Content

Kashi GoLean Honey Almond Flax Crunch isn’t only about fiber. It also has 9 grams of protein, 5 grams of fat, and 500mg of omega-3 fatty acids.

Taste

Users rate this fiber cereal as extremely delicious but warn new users to be wary because it contains chicory root, which can cause stomach issues.

Cost and Value

Kashi GoLean Honey Almond Flax Crunch is about the average price for a fiber cereal.

9. Mini Wheats (Kellog’s)

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
89
Mini Wheats (Kellog’s)
Features
90
Advanced Features
87
Value
91
Use
88
best offer for today
$33.58
Pros:

Sweet and crunchy

Easy to find in grocery stores

100% whole grain

Cholesterol free

Cons:

Not all natural

Just 21 of these flaky sweet biscuits give you 6 grams of fiber to start your day off right and give you plenty of fuel for your run.

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Nutritional Content

In one serving (21 biscuits) of Mini Wheats, you also get 190 calories, 1 gram of fat, and 5 grams of protein.

Taste

Users rate this cereal highly, with its classic combination of crunchy and sweet. Many users recommend letting your milk soak into the cereal, as it can be a little bit dry.

Cost and Value

This fiber cereal costs the average of other fiber cereals.

10. Organic Blue Corn Flakes (Health Valley)

The rating is based on the average rating (1-100) from all the criteria in which we rated this product.
88.5
Organic Blue Corn Flakes (Health Valley)
Features
90
Advanced Features
88
Value
87
Use
89
best offer for today
Pros:

Low calorie

Just sweet enough

Comes in an 11 ounce box with 6 packs inside

Contains antioxidants good for boosting the immune system

Cons:

May be difficult to find

Price can fluctuate depending on the retailer

A serving of this uniquely deep blue fiber cereal gives you 4 grams of dietary fiber.

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Nutritional Content

A ¾ cup serving of Health Valley Organic Blue Corn Flakes has 140 calories, no fat, no cholesterol, and 3 grams of protein.

Taste

Sweetened with organic cane juice, users rate these as tasty and not as sweet as other mass-produced corn flake varieties.

Cost and Value

This fiber cereal can be a little more expensive than other fiber cereals, depending on the retailer at which you shop.

Criteria Used for Evaluation

Features

To understand the nutritional value of a fiber cereal, it is important to first understand the function and benefit of the fiber itself, and how it will affect your body and your lifestyle. The main function of fiber in the diet is to move food and bulk through the intestines more efficiently. It also helps control the pH balance and acidity in the intestines, which serves a key function in helping fight against colon cancer. Fiber is also helpful in prolonging stomach emptying time, which helps your body better absorb key vitamins and nutrients.

Ultimately, fiber aids your digestives system in helping the rest of your body (and your day) run smoother. The benefits of fiber are far and wide – it helps maintain regularity and prevent constipation, as well as help bulk up stool if you tend to suffer from chronic diarrhea. Fiber also helps move bulk and waste through the colon more efficiently, so that it does not stick around for too long which can literally poison the colon and lead to an increased risk of cancer.

The obvious first thing we considered when ranking the cereals in our list is fiber content. A good fiber-rich cereal should have adequate amounts per serving. Although there is no dietary reference intake for fiber (meaning, the FDA does not have an amount of fiber intake that it says should absolutely be apart of your diet), experts recommend 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day as part of a holistically healthy and well-rounded diet. Furthermore, six to eight grams of fiber should be coming from the soluble fiber in order to get the most benefit. A decent fiber cereal will have a substantial percentage of your recommended daily intake of fiber. Our list aims to get in anywhere from 5 grams of fiber to almost 40 (which will make it super easy to get in your daily fiber!). By and large, cereals are typically talked about as great foods for children because they are often largely fortified with essential vitamins and minerals.

It just takes a quick glance at most cereal labels on the supermarket shelves to see that they come fortified with high amounts of vitamins and minerals that are essential to growth and overall health – specifically, Vitamins C, E, D, and decent amounts (as in, around 10 to 20 percent of your daily value) of iron, calcium, omega 3 fatty acids, etc. A nutritious cereal as part of a healthy breakfast is not only about what it has but about what it is FREE of. In our case, we looked to find cereals that were lower in or completely free of cholesterol and added sugars.

Sugar can be trickier. Many kinds of cereal have a high sugar content, especially fiber-rich or health-conscious cereals that use large amounts of sugar to make the taste more bearable. Even cereals that don’t taste sweet can have surprisingly high amounts of sugar. Not only do you want to avoid added sugars, but a good fiber cereal won’t have a ton of sugar substitutes (like Splenda or other sucrose and aspartame products) either. We made sure to prioritize cereals that had less sugar for our list.

Finally, when it comes to choosing cereals based on nutritional content, we considered the overall calories per serving, as well as the amounts of fat, carbohydrates, and protein per serving. The cereals on our list range from just 60 to 80 calories per 3/4 cup serving to upwards of 250 calories per serving. Both ends of the calorie spectrum have their benefits and pitfalls. However, with fewer calories often comes less taste as well, so be mindful of this when considering which option is best for you. Plus, these higher calorie options will also have higher macros – higher protein, higher carbohydrates, and higher fats.

Advanced Features

Just because the cereals on our list are packed with nutrients and loaded with fiber does not mean you should have to sacrifice taste! Traditionally, healthier cereals get a bad rap for taste for typically one of two reasons: they either taste like the cardboard box that its sold in or it is overly sweet in an attempt to make it more palatable. Then, not only does it end up tasting more like an ice cream sundae bar topping, but the sugar just adds to an already high amount of carbohydrates that cereals typically have because they are made from grains and wheat. The cereals listed here run the range of taste according to consumers.

Some reviewers do claim that the “stripped down” and basic fiber cereals like All Bran Buds and General Mills’ Fiber One Cereal taste a bit bland and need to be served up somewhat creatively to improve the taste. If you are in search of fiber cereals that have been reviewed as the yummiest, you are safe to go with the cereals that contain a variety of ingredients. Those on our list that have other bits of chocolate, granola clusters, and dried fruit like Post’s Grape Nuts and Kashi‘s Go Lean Crunch also have the highest ranking taste. If you have little ones who tend to be pickier eaters, but you need to get some fiber into their diet early on in the day, these options are some to keep in mind. There are a few “classics” on our list too, that get rave reviews from adults and kids alike. Kellogg’s Mini Wheats might be slightly lower in fiber than other options on the list, but they taste great and are favored by a wide variety of people.

One more thing we considered when looking at each cereal’s taste was texture. Texture can really make or break a taste experience. Dry cereals, like the bulk of our list, are not hot cereals; they should have an appropriate crunch. Even when served mixed in milk, most of the fiber cereals on our list maintain their crunchy texture (notably, General Mills’ Fiber One cereal and Post’s Grape Nuts)

Value

Cereals can, surprisingly enough, get pretty expensive especially if they have a “natural” or “organic” label tied to them. Some cereals that emphasize in certain special dietary needs, like fiber, can only be found in specialty stores. This can mean higher prices for these health-conscious foods, but luckily plenty of generic and household brands have caught onto the fiber craze. A large number of the cereals on our list can be found in just about any grocery store and are fairly inexpensive while still offering the dietary fiber you need.

Another way to keep costs down, and one which we considered when making our list, is whether or not the cereal can be bought in bulk. Not only did we think about those cereals that are sold in bulk at bulk warehouses, but many specialty and health food stores these days have “bulk bin” sections that sell various cereals and types of granola. Cereals are also more likely to last a long time, so you don’t have to worry about them going bad when you buy them in bulk.

We also considered how convenient and versatile each cereal is because that can definitely add to the value of what you’re getting. The more ways a cereal can be eaten or prepared, the better. So, many of the fiber cereals on our list can be eaten as a snack, a great addition to homemade trail mix, a smoothie ingredient, or something to bulk up your yogurt, ice cream, and oatmeal! Getting even more creative, you could use a lot of the cereals on our list as a healthier alternative to pastry dough in a pie crust.

Use

If you aren’t already paying close attention to the nutrition and ingredients in your food, we advise you start – especially if you want to start adding in fiber to your diet. The reason being is that you might already have an adequate amount of fiber in your diet, and adding too much fiber can actually end up backfiring. Too much of a good thing, in this case, can be a bad (er, uncomfortable) thing, especially for your tummy and digestive system.

If you track your intake and find out that you do, in fact, need to add some more fiber into your daily intake then we suggest you do so very slowly because the bacteria that line your stomach and small intestines need time to get used to a fiber increase. If you add fiber too quickly, you will likely experience lots of gas, bloating, cramps, and diarrhea. Need some suggestions on where to start? Try adding in just five grams of fiber into your diet every day for two-week intervals. You might still experience some minor gastro issues but it will be limited compared to what it would be if you added too much fiber in too quickly.

Frequently Asked Questions

q: What is fiber?
a:

Fiber is a type of carbohydrate, found in plant cells, that the human body cannot digest or break down. There are two main kinds of fiber: water soluble and water insoluble fiber.

q: What is soluble fiber? What is insoluble fiber? What is the difference?
a:

Soluble fiber is a type of fiber that absorbs water during digestion. They add bulk to stool, which helps fight diarrhea and similar symptoms. Soluble fiber is the fiber found in some fruits and veggies, legumes, and oats. Insoluble fiber does not absorb water and therefore remains unchanged during digestion.

This is the fiber that helps with constipation because it pushes material through the intestines without first being broken down. Insoluble fiber is also found in fruits and vegetables (particularly in edible peels and seeds), cereals, whole grain products, oats, and brown rice. Although there is no dietary reference intake for either type of fiber, it has been recommended that adults aim to get at least one-fourth of all dietary fiber from soluble fiber.

q: Why is fiber important? Why is soluble fiber particularly important?
a:

A high fiber diet has been proven to help reduce a variety of health risks and conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, diverticular disease, constipation, and colon cancer. Like we’ve already mentioned, fiber is important for maintaining and improving the digestive system. Soluble fiber, in particular, is important because it has been shown to reduce cholesterol levels of bad cholesterol (LDL).

q: How much fiber do I need each day?
a:

Aim for 25 to 30 grams per day of total dietary fiber, with 6 to 8 grams coming from soluble fiber. But don’t worry too much about the numbers – simply trying to get at least one serving of whole grains, cereals, or legumes into each meal with typically get you to that 25 to 30-gram sweet spot range.

q: What other foods have fiber?
a:

Grains, whole grains, legumes and beans (kidney beans, black beans, white beans, etc), whole fruits and veggies (NOT fruit juices) are all great sources of fiber.

q: Exactly how much fiber is in common fruits and vegetables?
a:

Raspberries take the cake, with one cup packing 8 grams of fiber. Apples, oranges, tangerines, pears, a cup of blueberries and a cup of strawberries all have around 3-4 grams of fiber per serving. A medium sweet potato, 1 cup of carrots, or half a cup servings of peas, cauliflower, and squash have 3 to 4 grams of fiber.

q: What about fiber supplements?
a:

Unlike other supplements, most fiber supplements don’t actually have as much fiber as fiber amounts found in foods. In fact, for the majority of fiber supplements found on the market today, most average only about 0.5 grams of fiber per tablet. Furthermore, there is not a ton of scientific evidence that show and prove the effectiveness of fiber supplements. If you really want to increase dietary fiber intake, read labels and stick to fiber-packed foods.

Sources

  1. University of California San Francisco Medical Center, Increasing Fiber Intake, University of California San Francisco Medical Center Health Webpage Article, Sep 18, 2017
  2. Mya Nelson, Preventing Colon Cancer: Six Steps For Reducing Your Risk, American Institute for Cancer Research, Feb 26, 2012
  3. University of Michigan Health System, High Fiber Diet, UM Health System Informational Health Article PDF,
  4. Dr. Mary Gavin, Adding Fiber to Your Family's Diet, KidsHealth Web Page Article, Sep 01, 2014